Channel 9 Breaking News | Buddy Australia App will challenge TripAdvisor

, , , , , , ,

Restaurant Industry has taken charge, TripAdvisor and other competitors watching buddy grow creates worry.

Channel 9 News recently featured buddy Australia Founder & CEO Danny Simmonds about Australia’s latest restaurant app.

“We built buddy to showcase our restaurants, eateries, bars and cafes to the best of our ability”. Danny Simmonds was standing proud as he explains what the buddy app can do for the food and beverage industry here in Australia.

 

Channel 9 New feature here;

 

 

When the Channel 9 news featured the article the team at buddy has not stopped receiving huge amounts of inquiries about the app, with questions such as how can businesses jump and board and also when will the app be released in Brisbane.

Well it is safe to say after the App has been trialed on the Sunshine Coast, the company is now making strategic plans to roll out the buddy app across Brisbane from next month.

“We will be using Brisbane as our case study” Danny Said, “We will be making Brisbane Australia’s first ‘Smart City’ by locating over 100 of our Beacons to connect the physical world to the digital world” he said proudly.

The buddy app provides restaurants and bars the ability to purchase a Beacon for their business profile, the business can then create automated push- notifications to buddy users alerting them of that venues specials, happy hours or events as you walk right by the front door. The app also will alert users when stepping off a train or bus letting them know of the top 5 places to go for coffee in that area.

The buddy app has much more features to enjoy such as following new places in the app for exclusive updates and also viewing itemised menu’s, specials and reviews.

We are all very much looking forward to watching buddy grow.

 

have you registered your business yet?

Download the app today!

click here.

 

Beacons Helps the People Who Are Blind Explore Wellington, New Zealand

,

Beacons Helps the People Who Are Blind

The desire to help the people who are partially-sighted was part of what the growth of beacon tech. Long before the commercial applications of beacons created the proximity industry, it was clear that the technology could be a tool for those who needed a little help navigating their way around public spaces.

Recently, Kontakt.io was on a team of partners who helped to implement a project backed by the Wellington City Council, New Zealand to install two hundred beacons in the central business district to assist the person who are blind or partially-sighted. The deployment was part of the Council’s Smart Capital strategy and has been praised by the City’s mayor as “a first for New Zealand and will build Wellington’s reputation as a smart and accessible destination” and “will welcome people with visual impairments to participate fully in the life of the city.”

Beacons detect, BlindSquare speaks

Some 200,000 New Zealanders have some form of visual impairment and the Wellington deployment was designed to make shopping, getting around and enjoying all that the area has to offer easier than ever.

Users can install a free application from BlindSquare in their iPhones and instantly take advantage of the navigation and information services available. After many successful deployments elsewhere around the world, this was the another use of BlindSquare’s navigational assistance capabilities in New Zealand.

The application uses text-to-speech to give users audible information about their environments and even the interior layout of buildings. It gives spoken contextual direction-specific information about the names of shops and what they offer, nearby public transport stops and even the names of streets they are walking along or crossing.

The idea was to build on the accessibility that beacons provided in retail, hotels and museums and take it to the next level by having everything interconnected with things like information about public transport. The project specifically set out to prove the value of a single beacon, in a single shop, illuminating the interior with information.

“We have seen excellent examples of how beacons can improve accessibility within places like retail, hotels and museums. Now it is about taking this a step further by having everything interconnected.” — Brent Albiston, Managing Director at Radiola Aerospace

Navigating inside and outside

The Wellington, BlindSquare Enabled Project was intended to offer rich information, inside and outside. In fact, a big part of the appeal for many in the partially sighted community was the ability to navigate indoors.

Travel for blind and partially sighted people becomes more difficult when they enter buildings. GPS signals are lost, no additional information is available, exploring new areas becomes harder and may even require sighted assistance. It is our goal to create environments that support independent travel, adventure, and the joys of choice, whether outdoors or indoors. We do this daily.” — Ilkka Pirttimaa, CEO at MIPsoft, creators of BlindSquare

Participation in the project was free for retailers and businesses were urged to take part. One beacon per location was installed for locations that joined with a couple of exceptions for buildings with multiple entrances. When anyone using the app passes by a beacon in one of the “BlindSquare-enabled” shops, services, offices or institutions, its name and a brief description can be heard along with information about the interior location of things like doors, stairs, and other features. This spoken information can be easily updated as needed.

New Zealand Blind Foundation CEO Sandra Budd says the beacon deployment in Wellington “will make businesses and their information more accessible and help people who are blind or have low vision to live a life without limits. Visitors will no longer encounter a void when they enter a business because there will now be information beyond the tip of the cane as they explore, enjoy their coffees, purchase their goods and visit with friends in the central city with new-found ease.”

The most important benefit of the beacon deployment in Wellington is enabling residents, visitors, and tourists who are visually impaired to explore, shop and enjoy their time in the Central Business District independently. Thomas Bryan of the Blind Foundation New Zealand sums it up nicely when he says “You don’t always want to be asking for help.”

“I strongly believe that Wellington City Council will inspire more local governments to implement beacon-based solutions for their societies. We couldn’t be more proud that we are a part of that story.” — Szymon Niemczura, CEO at Kontakt.io

Wellington, BlindSquare Enabled Project launch video: